White Boy Learning Burmese

The journey of an average white guy trying to learn a non-Indo-European language


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To whom it may concern in USA Government and authorities in Fort Wayne, Indiana State

What I find absolutely hilarious, is the rare situation in which I understand Burmese better than a native of Myanmar. This blogger, Dr. Abdul Rahman Zafrudin, is a Rohingya political activist who frequently head-hunts anyone he suspects of being anti-Rohingya. To him, this means bascially any person from Burma who is not a Rohingya or another ethnic person who is not (at least nominally) adherant to the Islamic faith. In this blog post, he misinterprets both of Ven. Ravika’s posts (Ven. Ravika is a monk in my hometown and I’m well-aware of his political views. Although politics do not interest me, mis-interpretation and mis-quoting of statements does) and thus labels Ven. Ravika as a racist. What he fails to understand is that Ravika, being a resident of the U.S., does indeed have freedom of speech and of the press.

More importantly, the translation of Ravika’s first phrase is inaccurate. Here is a better translation:
[i] When I observe these troublemakers, I notice that rather than being Burman, they tend to be Indians, Chinese, and multi-ethnic individuals who have taken Burman names. It’s evident that they are not recognized as pure Burmans by the Burmans themselves.
They appeal to the groups that don’t like the Burmese and reap the financial benefits therein. The way I see it, is that if the indigenous peoples and democrats had come to power [in the past], these impure [people] would be flattering the public servants in order to corrupt them. (NOTE: Meaning, it’s not really about ethnic power, but using your ethnicity as a ways and means to get your way.)
Let’s get rid of these pieces of trash for our country[‘s sake].[/i]

It should be pointed out that Ravika is not talking about all minorities, but these particular ones that are abusing powers and making other minorities look bad. Ravika is himself Mon and not Burman. Thus he is also included in the “not recognized” category. As for the “flattering the public servants” section, I’m sure he means that the indigenous non-Burmese public servants would be swayed by the appeals of the Rohingya and other minorities leading to just about the same amount of corruption that Burma has now.

Regarding the Chin soldiers, the context must be reviewed in that second post. He is talking about Chin soldiers from the “sticks” of Burma, not educated individuals living in a metropolitan society, like the many soldiers in the Myanmar military. So, of course they are (ရိုင်း) compared to them. However, he also mentions that those Chin are banding with the Burmese under Gen. Khin Nyunt in order to get food. Context people.

Dr. Ko Ko Gyi, you’re engaging in the exact same things that Ravika warned about: you’re using your ethnicity and authority given to you by foreigners who pamper you out of disgust of the Burmans to try to promote your political agenda. I for one, am not at all swayed by your pseudo-intellectualism.

That’s as political as this blog will go.

Win Hein

Dr Ko Ko Gyi's Blog

To whom it may concern in USA Government and authorities in Fort Wayne, Indiana State.

Reference: Complaint about Ven Ravika, Mon Monk living in Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA

Dear Sir/Madam,

May your honours kindly allow me to complaint about the above named person, Myanmar National originally from Mudon, Mon State, Myanmar, residing at Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA. His Face Book Account is @ https://www.facebook.com/ven.ravika

As he is believed to be a Mon Buddhist Monk and is a very popular activist amongst Myanmar and Mon Buddhist Democrats, his Racist Bigot Hate Speeches are detrimental to the mixed blooded people and non-Buddhists in Myanmar. Once he wrote that the Chins (soldiers) are non-Bama Christians and are wild and primitive people (soldiers). I have attached the original screenshots of his Hate Speeches against the mixed blooded Indian and Chinese below with the translation in English.

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[SPANISH –> ENG/ BUR] Cuando Me Enamoro

အားလုံး မဂၤလာပါ။ မေရးတာၾကာၿပီေနာ္။ ဒီေန႔ သူငယ္ခ်င္းတစ္ေယာက္အတြက္ စပိန္လိုဆိုျပတဲ့ သီခ်င္းတစ္ပုဒ္ကို အဂၤလိပ္ နဲ႔ ဗမာကို ျပန္ခဲ့ပါတယ္။ ေက်းဇူးျပဳၿပီး ဗမာျပန္ အရမ္းမွားရင္ ျပင္ေပးပါ။ သီခ်င္းနာမည္က “Cuando Me Enamoro”ၿပီး အဆိုေတာ့္ နာမည္က “Enrique Iglesias”လို႔ေခၚၾကပါတယ္။ (ေဒါင္းလုဒ္ရမယ္ေနာ္)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DO8GsIYfhQ

DOWNLOAD LYRICS HERE

(ဗြီဒီယုိ) ေမးခြန္း ၂ခု

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ဒီဗြီဒီယိုမွာ ကၽြန္ေတာ္ အေမရီကန္ျပည္မွာေနထိုင္တဲ့ ျမန္မာျပည္က လူေတြကို ေမးခြန္း ၂ခုေမးၾကည့္ပါတယ္။ ေက်းဇူးျပဳၿပီး မွတ္ခ်က္ေတြမွာ သို႔ ဗြီဒီယို ျပန္ေျပာျခင္းတစ္ပုဒ္ထဲမွာ ဒီေမးခြန္းေတြကို ေျဖၾကပါဦး


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ျမန္မာဖတ္စာ ဒုတိယတန္း ထည့္ထားျဖစ္ပါတယ္ဗ်ာ့။

အားလုံး မဂၤလာပါ။ ကၽြန္ေတာ္မွာ ကိုယ္တိုင္ scannerရၿပီမို႔လို႔ ဒီေန႔ ျမန္မာဖတ္စာေတြကို ဆယ္ scanဖတ္တာ စပါတယ္ဗ်ာ့။ ေက်းဇူးျပဳၿပီး ကၽြန္ေတာ့္ စာအုပ္ဆိုတဲ့ စာမ်က္ႏွာကို သြားၾကၿပီ ေဒါင္လုဒ္လိုက္ၾကပါ။

Hello everyone.  Since I’ve obtained my own scanner, today I’ve started continuing to scan the Myanmar Readers.  Please head on over to my “Books” page and download!


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ႏႈတ္ခြန္းဆက္ျခင္း ျမန္မာလုိဘာသာျပန္ေရးထားပါတယ္။

ျမတ္ႏုိးတ့ဲပရိတ္သတ္တုိ့ မဂၤလာပါ။

မေရးတာၾကာတ့ဲအတြက္ ေတာင္းပန္ပါတယ္။ တစ္ခါတစ္ေလမွာ ဘဝရဲ့ အစီအစဥ္ေတြဟာ ကြ်န္ေတာ့္ ဘေလာဂ္ရဲ့အစီအစဥ္ေတြနဲ့လုံးဝမတူဘူးေပါ့။ ခင္ဗ်ားတုိ့ အားလုံး ကြ်န္ေတာ့္ရဲ့ အဂၤလိပ္လုိေရးထားတ့ဲ ႏႈတ္ဆက္ခြန္းျခင္းကုိဖတ္ျပီးျပီလုိ့ေမွ်ာ္လင့္ပါတယ္။ ဒါေပမယ့္ တစ္ခ်ဳိ့လူေတြက အဂၤလိပ္လုိလုံးဝနားမလည္ၾကဘူးလုိ့သိပါတယ္။ ဒါေၾကာင့္ ေလာေလာဆယ္ ကြ်န္ေတာ့္ ႏႈတ္ခြန္းဆက္ျခင္း ျမန္မာလုိဘာသာျပန္ေရးထားပါတယ္ဗ်ာ့။ အျမဲတမ္းျဖစ္သလုိ အမွားေတြကုိေတြ့ရင္ ေက်းဇူးျပဳျပီး Comment Boxထဲမွာ ျပင္ေပးပါဦး။

ျမန္မာလုိေရးထားတ့ဲႏႈတ္ခြန္းဆက္ျခင္း

ေက်းဇူးကမ႓ာ

ကုိဝင္းဟိန္း


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Interesting Burmese word origins

This is a very interesting topic that English readers and Burmese readers can enjoy.

Fifty Viss

Burmese word origins
A graphic I made, showing some of the linguistic diversity found in the Burmese language.

Burmese has a hodgepodge of words that come from other languages, some that would surprise most people, at least me. It’s a given that many Burmese words come from Pali (from Buddhism) or English (from colonial rule), but quite a number of words also come from obscure and seemingly unrelated languages to Burmese. I’ve compiled a list of the most interesting ones.

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